History
The Pacific Century Institute (PCI) is a non-profit 501(c) organization based in Los Angeles, California with its focus in "building bridges between countries and people". PCI was initially founded in Louisville, Kentucky during the mid-1980s by the late Ronald D. McLaurin, Dr. Stephan Haggard, Dr. Chung-in Moon, Spencer H. Kim and Kenneth J. Tuggle.

While Louisville was clearly not part of the Pacific Rim region, the founders had a great interest in the region and understood that what happens in this part of the world impacts the rest of the globe.

The founders held organizational meetings with a vision toward improving international relations between countries and intercultural relations between the various inhabitants of the Pacific Rim region.

In the first years of PCI existence, they worked to expand knowledge and dialogue about the Pacific Rim by supporting Asian studies programs at regional universities, disseminating over 200,000 Asian language books to universities and schools.

Since incorporating as a 501(c) non-profit organization with private funding in the early 1990’s, PCI has been involved in a broad variety of activities designed to support its mission of promoting education, dialogue and research that will build a network of bridges of understanding that crisscross the Pacific Ocean.


Mission
The Pacific Century Institute’s mission is to foster education, policy dialogue and research. Our chosen constituencies are the significant actors on the regional stage government officials, scholars, business people and journalists.

PCI strives to provide a forum for discussion of regional problems, foster the creation of common solutions, promote cross-cultural communication, build bridges between the peoples of the Pacific Rim, especially focusing on gaps not being filled by other institutions, use imaginative "entrepreneurial" programming to fulfill its mission, and provide "seed money" to get initiatives off the ground; seek partners to carry forward.

All of these efforts are designed to construct a more open and harmonious future, one free from the forces of parochialism and chauvinism that have marred our mutual past.